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The Bilfinger Logo

The Bilfinger Logo

In 1858, astronomer August Ferdinand Mobius took a strip of paper and glued it together to form a ring, but before he glued it, he turned one end of the strip 180°. The result was an object that had no top and no bottom.an object that had but one edge and one side. Artists such as M. C. Escher were fascinated by this shape. One of his many drawings inspired by Mobius shows water flowing back into itself.

Engineers applied the principle to belt drives, giving them a design that wears more evenly. Audio tapes configured in this way can play back recordings in infinite loops. Mathematicians, however, were faced with a puzzle. Mobius had failed to produce an equation. The exact mathematical formula for the band named after him was not discovered until 2007 by scientists in London.

What you get if you take a strip of paper, tie it in a bow and twist one of the ends 180° before attaching it to the other end is a three-dimensional sculpture that has only one side and one edge: a variation of the classical Mobius band and the basic form of the new Bilfinger loop. 

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Ego, Identity and Corporate Identity

An Interview with neurophilosopher Thomas Metzinger.

Interview

The interlinking design in traditional Bilfinger blue and dynamic green symbolizes the combination of engineering flair and service mentality.